Research information from infosysplus.org: Organisations and projects in Malawi

Projects with partners - Malawi (13)

  • African Network for Agriculture, Agroforestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE)

    The African Network for Agriculture, Agroforestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE) is a network of 127 educational institutions in Africa whose objective is to strengthen the teaching of multi-disciplinary approaches to land management. The ANAFE Coordination Unit is hosted at the International Centre for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF) headquarters in Nairobi. This provides a vantage for network management, linkages with the research and development activities of ICRAF and its partners, and convenient communication facilities.

  • Developing biometric sampling systems and optimal harvesting methods for medicinal tree bark in southern Africa

    Objectives: To contribute locally to the knowledge base on which sustainable management plans can be prepared for tree species from which medicinal bark is harvested. The lessons learned through the research process will be generalised to provide advice on the most efficient manner to tackle generic NTFP sampling issues. Background: Tree bark is an important component of the pharmacopoeia of traditional healers in Africa and traditional medicine is still the main source of health care for the majority of Africans. As the population grows and becomes urbanised, forests shrink and the pressure on preferred bark species increases and trade is commercialised and orchestrated by market traders. In recent years the advent of the HIV/AIDS pandemic has increased the demand for medicinal herbs, including tree bark, as traditional healers work with the hospitals to find ways of alleviating the symptoms of AIDS.

  • Dissemination of improved Phaseolus bean varieties in Tanzania

    Objectives: Benefits for poor people generated by application of new knowledge on crop protection to cultivation of beans in the southern highlands of Tanzania. Background: Participatory farmer and researcher selection of promising disease resistant bean lines was carried out in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania [R7569]. The best two lines were identified and combined into a single variety for the production of Breeder seed. [Approved by the Seed Release Committee in November 2003, after completion of the project, under the variety name URAFIKI].

  • Domestication and marketing of indigenous fruit tree of the Miombo for improved household nutrition and incomes in Southern Africa

    Goal: To improve the well being of rural dwellers (farmers, marketers and consumers), in the Miombo ecosystem through improved domestication, utilization and commercialization of indigenous fruit trees and their products Major Results Achieved: The priority species list was updated in Zambia and Malawi, using more participatory approaches

  • Facilitating the widespread adoption of conservation agriculture (CA) in maize-based systems in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Major Research Domain: conservation agriculture, maize based systems, conservation tillage, zero tillage, direct seeding Goal: To improve livelihoods and food security for smallholder farmers in ESA through accelerated and widespread adoption of CA practices.

  • Fighting drought and aluminum toxicity: Integrating functional genomics, phenotypic screening and participatory evaluation with women and small-scale farmers to develop stress-resistant common bean and Brachiaria for the tropics

    To contribute to food security and sustainability of crop-livestock systems in tropical areas prone to drought stress and aluminum (AI) toxicity To discover drought and Al resistance candidate genes that are involved in maintaining root elongation under stress; to develop phenotypic and molecular tools to facilitate marker assisted selection (MAS) in common bean and Brachiaria; and to increase benefits to resource-poor farmers from stress-adapted, improved common bean and Brachiaria

  • Fighting drought and aluminum toxicity: Integrating functional genomics, phenotypic screening and participatory evaluation with women and small-scale farmers to develop stress-resistant common bean and Brachiaria for the tropics

    Goal: To contribute to food security and sustainability of crop-livestock systems in tropical areas prone to drought stress and aluminum (AI) toxicity Purpose: To discover drought and Al resistance candidate genes that are involved in maintaining root elongation under stress; to develop phenotypic and molecular tools to facilitate marker assisted selection (MAS) in common bean and Brachiaria; and to increase benefits to resource-poor farmers from stress-adapted, improved common bean and Brachiaria

  • Promotion of bean pest IPM

    Objectives: Promotion of integrated pest management strategies of major insect pests of Phaseolus beans in hillsides systems in eastern, central and southern Africa. Background: The novel approach developed in Project R7965 for disseminating and promoting bean IPM options from community to community was in the past one year, incorporating the outputs from the other cluster projects into the promotion exercise to scale out to communities. While increasingly utilising the framework and uptake mechanisms of the bean networks (ECABREN, SABRN and PABRA), the participatory approach (modified farmer field school- MFFS) has helped to intensify and extend activities in Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, DR Congo and Rwanda, and helped to create awareness in Madagascar, Mozambique, Zambia and Sudan.

  • Promotion of control measures for cassava brown streak disease

    Objectives: Ecology and epidemiology of cassava brown streak disease understood, and improved control methods and strategies developed and promoted. Background: Cassava plays a vital role in sustainable livelihoods in the coastal districts of eastern and southern Africa, where it is the preferred staple. Although CBSD was first reported more than 70 years ago, in recent times it was first recognised as the cause of significant crop loss in 1994 by NRI scientists working on cassava mosaic disease[CMD]. Some research on CBSD was included in one of the CMD projects showing that CBSD was widely distributed in the coastal regions and that the damaging symptom was root necrosis and this symptom was related to the foliar symptoms of CBSD. In 1996 project R6765 was the first one to focus primarily on CBSD showing that cultivars with tolerance to root necrosis could be found among the 'local cassava cultivars'. A collection of these cultivars was made which were screened for their reaction to both CBSD and CMD and virus free stocks obtained by repeated selection.

  • Promotion of Integrated Crop and Pest Management (ICPM) for smallholder coffee

    Objectives: Benefits for poor people generated by application of new knowledge on crop protection to smallholder coffee. Background: In 1996, the smallholder sector was in turmoil with poor prices being paid to farmers and coffee gardens neglected. Socio-economic surveys were conducted to assess the main constraints as perceived by the coffee smallholders. Farmers felt they were being unfairly treated by the Smallholder Coffee Authority [SCA] and inputs were difficult to get. Most coffee research was oriented to the estate sector in southern Malawi, and there was no information on the status of pests and diseases in the north. A previous project undertook extensive pests and disease surveys. This was followed by an eighteen month project to turn the findings of the previous project into an integrated crop and pest management system, to develop a control measure for WSB and to develop a participatory approach to promotion of the system. It is only now that the first planted Catimors are coming into full bearing and the agricultural and socio-economic advantages and disadvantages can be fully assessed.

  • Promotion of neglected indigenous vegetable crops (IV) for nutritional health in Eastern and Southern Africa (Phase II)

    Goal: To improve household food security of resource-poor groups in Eastern and Southern Africa by; 1) Safeguarding biodiversity of indigenous vegetables (IVs), 2) reducing malnutrition and poverty among small-scale farmers and consumers through promotion, production and consumption of IVs and 3) diversifying and stabilizing farmers’ income and nutritional health through higher quality seed and improved cultivation practices of IV crops Purpose: To enhance genetic resource base, technology dissemination and improved seed of IVs to safeguard biodiversity for better health, nutrition and improved income

  • Promotion of neglected indigenous vegetable crops for nutritional health in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Major Research Domain: vegetables, neglected crops, hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus), African eggplants (Solanum aethiopicum, S. Macrocarpon, S. Anguivi), Amaranth (Amaranthus spp.) Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata), Spiderflower (Gynandropsis gynandra), Jute Mallow (Corchorus olitorius), Nightshades (Solanum scabrum, S. americanum, S. villosum, S. Nigrum), Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus, A. Caillei), Pumpkin (Curcubita pepo, C. moschata), Moringa (Moringa olifera), Hyacinth Bean (lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet, syn. Dolichus lablab L., Lablab niger Medik, Vegetable Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Goal: To improve household food security of resource-poor groups in Eastern and Southern Africa through better uitilization of neglected indigenous vegetables

  • STEP tools to package and deliver information for local use

    Objectives: National and international crop post-harvest innovation systems respond more effectively to the needs of the poor. Background: The project aims to develop systems and tools to help build the capacity of local business development providers so they are better able to mobilise information locally to reach stakeholders and intermediaries involved in crop post-harvest chain activities. As a knowledge generation facilitating project, it will provide capabilities for BDS providers to construct and publish custom, multi-media, interactive solutions that can be used directly to target information more specifically to benefit farmers, community-based organisations, NGOs and others according to specific needs.